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Gabriel Fauré Requiem (edited by John Rutter)
John Rutter Birthday Madrigals
John Rutter Cantate Domino
John Rutter Dormi Jesu
John Rutter Fancies
John Rutter Feel the Spirit
John Rutter Five Childhood Lyrics
John Rutter Gloria
John Rutter I Will Lift Up Mine Eyes
John Rutter Magnificat
John Rutter Mass of the Children
John Rutter Requiem
John Rutter Suite Antique
John Rutter Te Deum
John Rutter When Icicles Hang
John Rutter Winchester Te Deum
John Rutter The Wind in the Willows


REQUIEM (Gabriel Fauré, ed. John Rutter)

Gabriel Fauré began work on his Requiem in 1887 purely, in his own words, 'for the pleasure of it'. At the time he was the choirmaster at the fashionable church of the Madeleine in Paris, and the completed first version of the Requiem was first performed their under his direction on 16 January 1888 on the occasion of the funeral service of a certain M. Joseph Le Soufaché. The work continued to be performed in this first version until 1893 when Fauré made an expanded version introducing the Offertoire and Libera me and including parts for bassoons, horns and trumpets. A third version followed – the familiar published one with full orchestra – which received its première in July 1900 at the Trocadéro Palace during the Paris World Exhibition, but it is not clear how much of this score was prepared by Fauré and how much was delegated to one of his assistants. The aim of this edition is to present the Requiem in a form as close as possible to Fauré's original more intimate concept of the work.
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BIRTHDAY MADRIGALS (John Rutter)

1. It was a lover and his lass
2. Draw on, sweet night
3. Come live with me
4. My true love hath my heart
5. When daisies pied


Birthday Madrigals was written at the invitation of Brian Kay, conductor of the Cheltenham Bach Choir, to celebrate the seventy-fifth birthday of the great jazz pianist George Shearing. The first performance was given, in his presence, in Cheltenham Town Hall on 3 June 1995 by the Cheltenham Bach Choir with Neil Swainson (double bass), the composer conducting.
The seed of the composition was It was a lover and his lass, written in 1975 and unusual in Rutter’s output in being influenced by the style of vocal jazz. The other four movements, their texts also drawn from the madrigal era (hence the work’s title) were added in 1995 to make the present choral suite.
NICHOLAS SHEPHERD
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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CANTATE DOMINO (John Rutter)

Cantate Domino is one of a number of choral psalm settings made by its composer. Unusually it is for a cappella choir, mostly treating the text in straightforward, homophonic style, although not without some chorally virtuosic touches. Towards the end the ninth-century Gregorian hymn Veni Creator Spiritus is introduced, a traditional invocation to the Holy Spirit.
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DORMI JESU (John Rutter)

The Latin text of Dormi, Jesu is of late medieval origin, one of a number of lullaby texts on the theme of the Virgin cradling the infant Jesus. The poet Coleridge (according to The New Oxford Book of Carols) discovered the poem on ‘a little print of the Virgin and Child in a small public house of a Catholic village’ in Germany, and made an English translation which was published in 1811. In my setting, written for the 1998 Christmas Eve Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols at King’s College, Cambridge, I have used its first verse to follow on from two Latin verses and refrains, in homage to the macaronic tradition long associated with the carol genre.
JOHN RUTTER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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FANCIES (John Rutter)

1. Tell me where is fancy bred
2. There is a garden in her face
3. The urchins’ dance
4. Riddle Song
5. Midnight’s bell
6. The Bellman’s Song

The occasion for which John Rutter wrote Fancies in 1971 was a summer concert in London given by the Richard Hickox Singers and Orchestra. The ‘fancies’ that give this evocative choral suite its title are the fleeting ideas, thoughts and daydreams which might pass through a poet’s mind on an idyllic summer’s evening. The texts, with the exception of the medieval Riddle Song, are sixteenth- or seventeenth-century English, madrigalian in character, lending themselves to lightweight, transparent musical setting. Influences of folk-song, madrigal, and both Mendelssohn’s and Britten’s Midsummer Night’s Dream music are acknowledged in Rutter’s score, which none the less bears his personal stamp, unconstrained by the liturgical boundaries of church music.
NICHOLAS SHEPHERD
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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FEEL THE SPIRIT (John Rutter)

The heritage of the African-American spiritual has fired the imagination of composers, performers, and audiences for more than a hundred years. Each generation has produced interpretations of many kinds, yet, curiously, rather few composers have combined the resources of soloist, choir, and orchestra. John Rutter was inspired by the vocal artistry of Melanie Marshall to build a set of spirituals crafted to her personal style, partnered by choir, with the orchestra to supply an extra dimension of colour and emotional depth. Feel the Spirit received its concert première in Carnegie Hall in June 2001.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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FIVE CHILDHOOD LYRICS (John Rutter)

1. Monday’s Child
2. The Owl and the Pussy-Cat
3. Windy Nights
4. Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
5. Sing a song of sixpence


As the title implies, the Five Childhood Lyrics were inspired by rhymes and verses for children, in the spirit of a homage to remembered childhood. Four of the five brief movements are simple, original settings, but the finale, ‘Sing a song of sixpence’, uses the melody as well as the words of a familiar nursery rhyme, treated with some tongue-in-cheek elaboration. One of Rutter’s relatively few a cappella choral works, Five Childhood Lyrics was commissioned and premièred in 1973 by the London Concord Singers.
NICHOLAS SHEPHERD
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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GLORIA (John Rutter)

Gloria was written as a concert work. It was commissioned by the Voices of Mel Olson, Omaha, Nebraska, and the composer directed the first performance on the occasion of his first visit to the United States in May 1974. The Latin text, drawn from the Ordinary of the Mass, is a centuries-old challenge to the composer: exalted, devotional and jubilant by turns. Rutter’s setting, which is based mainly on one of the Gregorian chants associated with the text, divides into three movements roughly corresponding to traditional symphonic structure. The accompaniment is for brass ensemble with timpani, percussion and organ – a combination which in the outer movements makes quite a joyful noise unto the Lord, but which is used more softly and introspectively in the middle movement. The composer later made a version with full orchestra.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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I WILL LIFT UP MINE EYES (John Rutter)

I will lift up mine eyes is a psalm setting for mixed choir and orchestra, dating from 1974.

I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills:
from whence cometh my help.
My help cometh even from the Lord:
who hath made heaven and earth.
He will not suffer thy foot to be moved:
and he that keepeth thee will not sleep.
Behold, he that keepeth Israel: shall neither slumber nor sleep.
The Lord himself is thy keeper:
the Lord is thy defence upon thy right hand;
So that the sun shall not burn thee by day:
neither the moon by night.
The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil:
yea, it is even he that shall keep thy soul.
The Lord shall preserve thy going out, and thy coming in:
from this time forth and for ever more. Amen.

(Psalm 121)
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MAGNIFICAT (John Rutter)

The composer writes:
The passage from St. Luke (chapter 1, verses 46–55) known as the Magnificat – a poetic outpouring of praise, joy and trust in God, ascribed by Luke to the Virgin Mary on learning that she was to give birth to Christ – has always been one of the most familiar and well-loved of scriptural texts, not least because of its inclusion as a canticle in the Catholic office of Vespers and in Anglican Evensong. Musical settings of it abound, though surprisingly few of them since J.S. Bach’s time give the text extended treatment. I had long wished to write an extended Magnificat, but was not sure how to approach it until I found my starting point in the association of the text with the Virgin Mary. In countries such as Spain, Mexico and Puerto Rico, feast days of the Virgin are joyous opportunities for people to take to the streets and celebrate with singing, dancing and processions. These images of outdoor celebration were, I think, somewhere in my mind as I wrote, though I was not fully conscious of the fact till afterwards. I was conscious of following Bach’s example in adding to the liturgical text – with the lovely old English poem ‘Of a Rose’ and the prayer ‘Sancta Maria’ (both of which strengthen the Marian connection) and with the interpolated ‘Sanctus’, sung to the Gregorian chant of the Missa cum jubilo in the third movement. The composition of Magnificat occupied several hectic weeks early in 1990, and the première took place in May of that year in Carnegie Hall, New York.
JOHN RUTTER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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MASS OF THE CHILDREN (John Rutter)

Mass of the Children was written in response to an invitation to compose a new work for a concert given in Carnegie Hall during the American Choral Directors Association’s national convention in New York in February 2003. Rutter’s larger-scale choral works have been relatively few – the Gloria, the Requiem and the Magnificat are the most often performed – but each one has a distinct character. The Mass of the Children represents something new in the composer’s work insofar as it was conceived with an integral role for a children’s choir alongside an adult mixed choir, two soloists, and orchestra. The role of the children’s choir is to add a further dimension to the traditional Latin Mass sung by the adult choir, sometimes commenting, sometimes amplifying the meaning and mood. The Mass itself (a Missa Brevis, that is to say a Mass without a Credo section) is mainly sung by the adult choir or the soloists. The children sometimes sing the Latin – for example at the Christe eleison, the opening of the Gloria and at the Benedictus – but elsewhere they and the two soloists sing specially chosen English texts which in some way reflect upon or illuminate the Latin. The work opens with two verses from Bishop Thomas Ken’s morning hymn for the Scholars of Winchester College, and it closes with the children singing his evening hymn with Tallis’ timeless melody, as the adults intone the traditional Dona nobis pacem, a prayer for peace. This creates a framework (from waking to sleeping) within which other texts and moods appear in kaleidoscopic succession, like events in a day or landmarks in a life.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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REQUIEM (John Rutter)

Requiem was written in 1985 in memory of the composer’s father. The first performance was given in Dallas, Texas in October 1985, and what was conceived as a personal memorial has gone on to become one of John Rutter’s internationally most often-performed choral works, both in church and concert hall.
Unlike the dramatic, large-scale Requiems of Berlioz and Verdi, Rutter’s setting belongs in the smaller-scale, more devotional tradition of Fauré and Duruflé. The choral forces do not need to be large, there is only one soloist, the instrumentation is restrained, the duration less than forty minutes. As with Fauré and Duruflé, the Latin text of the Missa pro defunctis is not set in its entirety, the chosen portions being those which underline a theme of light and consolation emerging out of darkness and despair; and as with more than one twentieth-century Requiem, vernacular texts are interwoven with the traditional Latin. There are two psalms associated with the rite of burial, the sombre De profundis (Psalm 130) and the serenely confident Psalm 23, each of these settings having an important part for a solo instrument, cello and oboe respectively. In addition, movements 5 and 7 incorporate sentences from the Anglican Burial Service, in the incomparably magnificent English of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer.
The complete seven-movement work forms an arch-like structure: the first and last movements are prayers to God the Father, movements 2 and 6 are psalms, 3 and 5 are prayers to Christ the Son, and the central Sanctus is an affirmation of divine glory.
The occasion of a Requiem is one for reflection and looking back, and, like a number of composers in their Requiem settings, Rutter pays homage to his predecessors – influences including Fauré, Mahler, Howells and Gershwin can be detected, along with the use of Gregorian chant at two key points in the work – but out of these disparate elements a synthesis emerges which has been widely recognized as the composer’s own.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

US users please amend spelling of ‘sombre’ to ‘somber’

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SUITE ANTIQUE (John Rutter)

For flute, harpsichord and strings

I. Prelude
II. Ostinato
III. Aria
IV. Waltz
V. Chanson
VI. Rondeau


The Suite Antique was written in 1979 in response to an invitation to write a piece for the Cookham Festival, and was premièred by Duke Dobing and the London Baroque Soloists in Cookham Parish Church. Since Bach’s Brandenburg Concerto No.5 was in the programme, Rutter decided to write for the same combination of instruments, using the forms and styles of Bach’s day.

The Suite is written for flute, harpsichord and strings with six movements ranging from a Bach-like aria to a jazz-influenced waltz. Rutter’s own style comes forth most strongly in the final Rondeau with its characteristically forward-driving rhythms and melodic lines.
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TE DEUM (John Rutter)

The Te Deum is one of the most ancient, and inspiring, of Christian liturgical texts. At one time it was believed to have been jointly written by St. Ambrose and St. Augustine, but recent research suggests it is even older, originating early in the fourth century as a Preface, Sanctus, and concluding prayer for the Mass of the Easter Vigil; there are even echoes of the psalms heard at several points in the text. John Rutter’s setting was written in 1988 for the Guild of Church Musicians, celebrating their centenary at a service of thanksgiving in Canterbury Cathedral. The circumstances of the first performance allowed for only a brief period of rehearsal, so the music had to be straightforward and accessible. At only seven minutes in length, Rutter’s setting clearly belongs to the Anglican tradition of “functional” Te Deums rather than the symphonic tradition embodied in such extended settings as those of Handel or Charpentier, but it is also performed in non-liturgical contexts and in choral concerts – wherever, in fact, its great text of praise and thanksgiving is appropriate.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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WHEN ICICLES HANG (John Rutter)

For choir and orchestra

i. Icicles
ii. Winter Nights
iii. Good ale
iv. Blow, blow, thou winter wind
v. Winter wakeneth all my care
vi. Hay, ay


The composer writes:
When Icicles Hang will forever be associated in my mind with the much-missed figure of Russell Burgess, whose Wandsworth School Boys’ Choir was such a colourful and inspiring part of the musical scene in the 1960s and 70s. Russell asked me to write a seasonal but not specifically Christmas work for a December concert given by the choir in London’s Queen Elizabeth Hall in 1973, and, in writing it, I think I unconsciously reflected some of the contradictory facets of Russell’s endearing personality: his rumbustiousness in Good ale and Hay, ay, his gentleness in Blow, blow, thou winter wind, perhaps also something of his underlying melancholy (so often to be found in great men of action) in Winter wakeneth all my care. We all lamented his untimely passing at the age of only 48, but his work lives on in the gift of singing he gave to so many young people.
JOHN RUTTER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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WINCHESTER TE DEUM (John Rutter)

The Winchester Te Deum was written in 2006 for the choirs and organist of Winchester Cathedral. The occasion was the installation of a new Dean, a festive cathedral event at which a Te Deum is traditionally sung. Rutter’s setting of this ancient and renowned text (a text reputedly dating in part from the sixth century or earlier) was inspired by the fine peal of bells in the cathedral tower. Bell-like figures are heard throughout the piece, contributing to its joyful, celebratory character. As with the composer’s earlier Te Deum setting of 1988, the accompaniment, originally for brass and organ, was later scored for full orchestra for use in concert performances.
LOUISE LUEGNER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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THE WIND IN THE WILLOWS (John Rutter)

Kenneth Grahame’s enchanting book The Wind in the Willows was first published in 1908 and has remained one of the best-loved of children’s classics, enjoyed equally by generations of adult readers too. This musical adaptation was originally written as an ‘entertainment’ for the King’s Singers (six male voices) and the City of London Sinfonia to perform at a family concert. The present published version, for five soloists, narrator and chorus, can either be performed as a concert piece or staged in various ways.
JOHN RUTTER
This note may be used in concert programmes, provided due acknowledgement is given as below:
© Collegium Records

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